Find Local Treatment Options
Call 800-481-6320 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Long-Term Effects of Alcoholism

You may spend time making excuses for your drinking. Yes, you get strong cravings to drink, but that is just your stress talking. Everyone needs a glass of wine or a glass of scotch to take the edge off, right? Yes, every once in a while when you drink, you just can’t stop, but that’s because you are having a good time. That’s just partying. Yes, you do need to drink more and more to get the same effect, but that happens to everyone, right? No.

Craving, loss of control, tolerance, and physical dependence are all markers of an alcohol use problem. More specifically, alcoholism.

If you are working overtime to hide the severity of your addiction instead of getting treatment, you are setting yourself up for some very serious long-term effects on your health. This isn’t about your drinking driving away your spouse or costing your job; this is about losing your life.

If you have a dependence on alcohol, the time to stop is now. If you don’t, you are running some serious risks. For help seeking treatment and breaking your dependence on alcohol, contact RehabCenters.com at 800-481-6320 and speak with someone today. We can connect you with the treatment that you need.

Drinking Level Definitions

The goal for most people should be moderate alcohol consumption, which is—according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans—up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.

One form of alcohol abuse is binge drinking. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines binge drinking as “a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically occurs after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men—in about 2 hours.”

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), on the other hand, defines binge drinking as “drinking 5 or more alcoholic drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days.”

SAMHSA also defines heavy drinking as “drinking 5 or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days.”

The Brain

Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with major, widespread brain lesions. In addition to the direct toxic effects of alcohol, other factors play a role in alcohol-induced brain damage, including:

  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Nutritional deficits
  • Electrolyte disturbances
  • Liver damage

Other problems associated with the brain and nervous system include:

  • Stroke: The National Stroke Association reports more than 2 drinks per day increase stroke risk by 50 percent.
  • Impaired prospective memory (remembering to do something at a future time or date): The more alcohol consumed and the longer the period of consumption, the higher the degree of impairment
  • Alcohol-related dementia
  • Essential tremors: a movement disorder where part of the body make involuntary tremors
  • Insomnia

The Heart

Effects of Alcoholism

Alcoholism, over time, can lead to high blood pressure and other heart problems.

Frequent drinking over a long period of time can cause coronary problems, including:

  • Cardiomyopathy: Stretching and drooping of heart muscle
  • Arrhythmia: Irregular heart beat
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure

The Liver

Most people are aware of the frequency with which heavy drinkers develop problems with their liver. Treatment options are limited and, in extreme cases, may only be solved with a liver transplant. Possible liver problems include:

  • Steatosis: Fatty liver
  • Alcoholic hepatitis: inflammation of the liver
  • Fibrosis: thickening and scarring of connective tissue
  • Cirrhosis: late stage of scarring of the liver caused by many forms of liver diseases and conditions

Cancer

Excessive alcohol consumption has also been linked to increased risk of the following cancers:

  • Mouth
  • Esophagus
  • Throat
  • Liver
  • Breast

Immune System

Drinking too much weakens the immune system, making chronic drinkers more likely to catch diseases. They are more likely to contract diseases such as tuberculosis and pneumonia than non-drinkers.

If you are concerned about your drinking and worried about the long-term effects it is having on your health, you need to seek treatment. Contact RehabCenters.com at 800-481-6320 and get connected to treatment possibilities that can change your life and save your health.

Health Effects of Teenage Alcoholism

More Rehab Centers Resources

Alternatives to Traditional Drug Addiction Rehab

addiction treatment

Formal drug addiction treatment at a traditional rehab facility is still considered to be the best possible option for most individuals with substance use disorders. Formal treatment can be either in an inpatient or outpatient-based facility, and usually consists of a treatment plan including medication, therapy, and several other medical care options (depending on the….

Continue reading

What You Must Know About Drug Rehab Counselors

Drug rehab counselors are here to help you!

When you first enter into a drug rehab program the most important relationship you will make is that between yourself and your drug rehab counselor. Not only do you have to feel comfortable with your drug rehab counselor but you must also be accepting and willing to work together on your addiction treatment. The experience….

Continue reading

Signs of Heroin Addiction You Can’t Ignore

heroin addiction

Heroin is an opioid that they make from the opiate morphine. It is a synthetic form of the pain killer that originally came from the opium poppy in Asia. Heroin is typically a white or brown powder or in the case of Black Tar Heroin, it is a black sticky substance resembling tar. According to….

Continue reading

What to Expect at Eating Disorder Rehab

How Do Eating Disorders Disrupt a Person’s Life? Eating disorders greatly disrupt a person’s life, not only do they negatively impact a person’s physical health, but they also become the main focus in a person’s life, resulting in the thoughts of food and eating and losing weight, taking over their thought processes. A person with….

Continue reading

Is My Husband an Alcoholic?

There is help for your husband!

A common question that many wives have is whether or not their husband is an alcoholic. Let’s face it, many men (and women) like to drink on a regular basis—but does this make every one of them an alcoholic? Not necessarily! There is more to being an alcoholic than simply having a few beers with the guys after….

Continue reading

What Are the Residential Treatment Options for Dual Diagnosis?

When dual diagnosis—the presence of an additional condition along with an addiction—is a factor in someone’s addiction, their treatment plan should take it into account. Residential treatment centers often modify their treatment plans in the case of dual diagnosis, which you should keep in mind as you call . If you have a dual diagnosis,….

Continue reading

28 Days: Is it Really Long Enough?

Drug rehab programs differ in many ways in terms of length of stay, treatment approach and level or intensity of treatment. While most all programs work to accomplish the same ends, “cookie-cutter” approaches to drug rehab can’t address the range of needs individuals bring to the treatment process. The 28 day drug rehab model provides….

Continue reading

Heading Back to Work After Drug Rehab

It is a step by step process when you are heading back to work after drug rehab.

Many who are addicted to drugs tend to be functioning addicts who still hold a job and work each day. Far more are actually out of work and have lost sight of the importance of holding a day to day career. Regardless of whether you continue to work while you are addicted to drugs or….

Continue reading

Still can't find the help you are looking for?Get Started Now
Accepted Insurances / View the full list
For inquiries call800-481-6320

Accepted Insurances Does My Insurance
Cover This?

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This